Make Safe Sex Fun Sex

Make Safe Sex Fun Sex

Make Safe Sex Fun SexHeart Condom

Safe sex is easier to preach than to practice, but you can master the art of it to make safe sex fun sex 100% of the time. According to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC), an estimated 110 million Americans are currently infected with one or more Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI’s), and half of all new infections occur in young people ages 15-24. The majority of STI’s can be prevented using a classic method of protection, the condom.  It is estimated that young people only use condoms half of the time when engaging in sexual behavior.

We’d like to offer a few tips and suggestions about how to make using condoms fun and easy.  Many people believe that using a condom inhibits you from experiencing total pleasure during a sexual encounter. This is a false sense of the truth. By protecting yourself or your partner from disease, and possibly unwanted pregnancy, you will save yourself the unnecessary nagging stress caused by putting on yourself or your partner at risk.  This will allow you to be more present and vulnerable in moment and this leads to greater pleasure in the moment and peace of mind for days to come.

Here are some tips on how to stay safe, without sacrificing the fun:

  1. Use a reliable lubricant, in conjunction with a condom: It is not uncommon for condoms to dry out during sex, making the condom more likely to break. Begin by putting a drop of condom compatible, silicone-based lubricant such as Wet® Platinum® Premium Lubricant, or condom compatible water-based lubricant, such as Wet® Light® Liquid Lubricant, inside the reservoir tip of the condom before unrolling it. Add plenty of lube on the outside of the condom after you roll it down the shaft or the sex toy of your choice.  The lube on the outside will reduce friction and the lube on the inside of the condom will make the sensation feel more natural.
  2. Keep multiple condoms nearby: As stated above, sometimes condoms dry out, and if adding more lubricant doesn’t help, you’re going to want to grab another condom. You are less likely to do so, if the condom is not in arm’s reach. If the penis becomes flaccid at any point, you’ll need to use another condom before you go again. Furthermore, if you are engaging in both anal and vaginal play, changing condoms between orifices keeps it clean and less likely that a bacterial infection will occur.
  3. Try a cock ring: Cock rings help to maintain an erection by holding blood flow inside the penis. After rolling the condom down, roll a rubber cock ring down to the base of the penis. It will help the condom stay securely in place, and it may increase the sensation the man feels, making it feel as if he’s not wearing a condom at all.
  4. Try the female condom: The female condom is a great alternative to using a male condom and can be used during both anal and vaginal sex. If you are not familiar with how to use a female condom, you can learn more here.

It’s true that there are a handful of STI’s from which condoms do not offer protection, such as herpes and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), but this should not be a reason to brush-off their overall effectiveness. The reason that condoms do not protect against herpes and HPV, is because they are transmitted through skin to skin contact and not bodily fluids. Learning the facts about condom efficacy is the first step in keeping yourself safe and healthy.

Hopefully this article has helped you learn more about safer sex practices. If you and your partner are not monogamous, or have not been tested for STI’s recently, be sure to #wrapitbeforeyoutapit.

 

 

 

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